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Prominent Figures

  • Several biographies

    Websites/Multiple Documents

    Title: Biographies
    Description/subject: Short biographical profiles of: U Aung Gyi, Gen. Aung San, Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, Gen. Khin Nyunt, Gen. Maung Aye, Dr. Maung Maung, Min Ko Naing, Gen. Ne Win, U Nu, Gen. Saw Maung, Gen. Sein Lwin, Gen. Than Shwe, U Tin Oo [NLD], Gen. Tin Oo...
    Language: English
    Source/publisher: "The Irrawaddy" Research Pages
    Format/size: html
    Date of entry/update: 03 June 2003


  • Daw Aung San Suu Kyi
    See the main Aung San Suu Kyi Section

    Individual Documents

    Title: Game over for Aung San Suu Kyi?
    Date of publication: 16 September 2014
    Description/subject: "Despite a constitutional roadblock, there is still a chance that Aung San Suu Kyi can become Myanmar’s next leader, reports Belinda Cranston. Aung San Suu Kyi’s dream of becoming Myanmar’s next president is not necessarily over, despite an article in the country’s constitution preventing her from standing for the presidency. A committee charged with reviewing Myanmar’s 2008 Constitution is submitting its recommended changes during the next session of parliament, which began on 11 September. Of particular interest to Aung San Suu Kyi’s National League for Democracy, (NLD) is a military drafted clause that bars her from standing for presidency ahead of the 2015 national elections, because her late husband and children are foreigners. The main disagreement within the Joint Committee to Review the Constitution is whether to propose changing section 436, which gives the military a veto over constitutional change. Committee members have told The Myanmar Times only three military representatives were opposed to reducing the threshold for constitutional change from 75 per cent to a two-thirds majority. “That is the normal majority that you would expect in most democracies around the world,” said Trevor Wilson, a visiting fellow at the ANU College of Asia and the Pacific, who served as Australia’s ambassador to Myanmar from 2000 to 2003. “So that would bring their constitution more in line with other, so-called democratic constitutions.” A concerted campaign organised earlier this year by the NLD and Aung San Suu Kyi collected five million signatures petitioning change to certain clauses of the constitution. Even if the NLD is disappointed with recommendations the committee hands down, Mr Wilson doesn’t believe the party will replace Suu Kyi with someone who can legally run for president. “There will be no change in NLD leadership unless Suu Kyi decides she wants to go,” he said. Health reasons could decide that for her, he added. Given her popularity and nation-wide profile, it’s unlikely the NLD would want to replace Suu Kyi with someone who can legally contest the leadership. “The NLD has never had any plan for someone to deputise for Suu Kyi or be ready to succeed her,” Wilson said. “They respect her. They would never think of challenging her leadership or her position. “Because she has such authority and respect, to have her as the leader of the party is still incredibly important in an election.”.....Read the full article at the ANU College of Asia and the Pacific website. Watch a video of Trevor Wilson discussing Aung San Suu Kyi’s chances of becoming Myanmar’s next president.
    Author/creator: Belinda Cranston
    Language: English
    Source/publisher: "New Mandala"
    Date of entry/update: 12 December 2014


    Title: Myanmar leaves old dichotomies behind
    Date of publication: 14 March 2014
    Description/subject: "Speaking Freely is an Asia Times Online feature that allows guest writers to have their say. Please click here if you are interested in contributing. The rise of Myanmese President Thein Sein's quasi-civilian government in 2011 was met largely with skepticism that his administration would be a continuation of military rule by different means. Such concerns were justified, as Thein Sein had served as prime minister under the previous ruling military junta. First introduced as the "seven step roadmap" to democracy in 2003, the entire democratic "reform" process was designed and implemented exclusively by the ruling generals. The culmination of this process resulted in the staging and rigging of the 2010 general elections to ensure the victory of the military's political surrogate, the Union of Solidarity and Development Party (USDP), led by a number of recently retired senior military officers. To be sure, the military's manipulation of the electoral process and new democratic structures has been obvious. The exact motivations behind the military's introduction of a new democratic order and move away from direct military rule are still unclear. The implication of such an extensive reconfiguration of the state is, however, significant in its own right..."
    Author/creator: Adam P MacDonald
    Language: English
    Source/publisher: "Asia Times Online"
    Format/size: html
    Date of entry/update: 28 May 2014


    Title: Hoffnung auf Zehenspitzen
    Date of publication: 23 August 2002
    Description/subject: Aung San Suu Kyi - Nahaufnahme einer Ikone
    Author/creator: Charlotte Wiedemann
    Language: Deutsch, German
    Source/publisher: Freitag Jg. 2002 Nr. 35
    Format/size: php 19k
    Date of entry/update: 20 March 2006


  • General Khin Nyunt

    Individual Documents

    Title: "Romeo and Juliet" Love Dooms Son
    Date of publication: April 1998
    Description/subject: Burma's strong man and intelligence chief, has publicly announced that he has disowned his son. Lt Gen. Khin Nyunt and his wife Dr Daw Kin Win Shwe placed an advertisement in state-run New Light of Myanmar announcing that their son "Dr Ye Naing Win was disowned by the parents for his inexcusable deed".
    Author/creator: Yurdle
    Language: English
    Source/publisher: "The Irrawaddy", Vol. 6. No. 2
    Format/size: html
    Date of entry/update: 03 June 2003


  • General Than Shwe

    Individual Documents

    Title: The Emperor Looks to The Future
    Date of publication: June 2010
    Description/subject: How will Snr-Gen Than Shwe safeguard himself and his family after the election?... "In an interview with a US television journalist on April 14, Singapore’s Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong predicted that Burma’s ruling generals will not easily give up power, saying it is an “existential thing” for the few key people who make the decisions..."
    Author/creator: Aung Zaw
    Language: English
    Source/publisher: "The Irrawaddy" Vol. 18, No. 6
    Format/size: html
    Date of entry/update: 29 August 2010


    Title: Than Shwe's Grandson Steals the Show
    Date of publication: December 2009
    Description/subject: For many visitors to November’s Auto Show in Rangoon, the real attraction wasn’t the flashy cars but Nay Shwe Thway Aung, the 18-year-old playboy grandson of the junta’s No 1, Snr-Gen Than Shwe.
    Language: English
    Source/publisher: "The Irrawaddy" Vol. 17, No. 9
    Format/size: html
    Date of entry/update: 28 February 2010


    Title: Mächtiger Chef der Junta gegen Mönche
    Date of publication: 27 September 2007
    Description/subject: Er hat sie alle unter sich: die Streitkräfte, die Regierung. Er weiß, wie man herrscht, foltert, unterdrückt. In psychologischer Kriegsführung ist er in jungen Jahren profund ausgebildet worden, als es Ende der 1950er-Jahre darum ging, gegen die Minderheit der Karen zu kämpfen; Aufstieg Than Shwes seit 1988; Politik Than Shwes; politics of Than Shwe since 1988
    Language: German, Deutsch
    Source/publisher: Der Standard
    Format/size: html
    Date of entry/update: 07 May 2008


    Title: Than Shwe—Man in the Iron Mask
    Date of publication: February 2005
    Description/subject: Burma’s paramount leader may be an unknown figure to most, but he has shown his leadership mettle... "The Burmese hardly know their paramount leader, Snr-Gen Than Shwe. His former close friends knew him as an honest and simple soldier. But even if he lacks charisma and possesses few rounded leadership skills today, he has an iron grip on power..."
    Author/creator: Aung Zaw
    Language: English
    Source/publisher: "The Irrawaddy" Vol. 13, No. 2
    Format/size: html
    Date of entry/update: 28 August 2005


    Title: Than Shwe: Burma’s Strongman?
    Date of publication: January 2003
    Description/subject: "The unrivalled leader of the country shows no signs of yielding power... When Burma was rocked by nationwide street demonstrations in 1988, a high-ranking army officer feared the mob might suddenly turn their anger against his family. To protect them, says a close friend of the officer, he locked his family inside their home because "they were scared to death". The head of that household is Sr-Gen Than Shwe, now the leader of Burma’s military government. Today, the streets in Rangoon are safer than in 1988 and his family no longer worries for their security. But Than Shwe is not about to let down his guard. "He is still scared," jokes a former army officer living in Rangoon. "Scared to give up power." His paranoia does not augur well for the people of Burma..."
    Author/creator: Aung Zaw
    Language: English
    Source/publisher: "The Irrawaddy" Vol. 11, No. 1
    Format/size: html
    Date of entry/update: 03 June 2003


  • U Ne Win

    Individual Documents

    Title: Sorting the Tamadaw After Ne Win
    Date of publication: January 2003
    Description/subject: "With Ne Win’s death, some say the personality-driven succession arrangements among leaders of the armed forces will go too... If history is any guide, the current military leaders will find it tougher to manage succession arrangements within the Tatmadaw (armed forces) in the wake of Ne Win’s death and the collapse of his personal dictatorship. A new style of personality power was institutionalized when Ne Win, sensing the important role the military would play in determining Burma’s post-colonial fate, gained control of the Tatmadaw in 1949. Only his most trusted proteges rose among the ranks while he demoted other officers whimsically. He personally handpicked former Gen Saw Maung and the current Number One, Sr-Gen Than Shwe..."
    Author/creator: Min Zin
    Language: English
    Source/publisher: "The Irrawaddy" Vol. 11. No. 1
    Format/size: html
    Date of entry/update: 03 June 2003


    Title: The Talk of the Town Turns Ninety
    Date of publication: May 2001
    Description/subject: With the talks between Burma's military rulers and the democratic opposition still under wraps in Rangoon, the talk of the capital has turned to the latest public appearance by former dictator Ne Win.
    Language: English
    Source/publisher: "The Irrawaddy", Vol. 9. No. 4 (Intelligence section)
    Format/size: html
    Date of entry/update: 03 June 2003


    Title: The King Who Never Dies
    Date of publication: April 2001
    Description/subject: Ne Win, the mastermind behind Burma's decline as a modern nation, has emerged from the shadows for the first time this century.
    Author/creator: Aung Zaw
    Language: English
    Source/publisher: "The Irrawaddy", Vol. 9, No. 3
    Format/size: html
    Date of entry/update: 03 June 2003


    Title: Broadening the Breach
    Date of publication: July 2000
    Description/subject: In November 1977, Burmese dictator Ne Win made a visit to Cambodia, then under the control of the Khmer Rouge. Prompted by a request from China, the trip also helped Ne Win to neutralize the influence of the Communist Party of Burma by exploiting a growing rift between the conservative CPB leadership and reformers rising to power in Beijing. Bertil Lintner examines this revealing episode in Ne Win's political career.
    Language: English
    Source/publisher: "The Irrawaddy", Vol..8 No. 7
    Format/size: html
    Date of entry/update: 03 June 2003


    Title: Back in the Limelight
    Date of publication: September 1997
    Description/subject: Burma's former leader Ne Win arrived in Jakarta for a three-day visit amid speculation that Indonesian President Suharto was to ask the Burmese patriarch to influence Rangoon's military junta to open dialogue with opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi. Speculation began to circulate in Jakarta two months ago that Suharto was inviting Ne Win to come discuss the issue of democratisation in Burma.
    Language: English
    Source/publisher: "The Irrawaddy", Vol. 5. No. 6
    Format/size: html
    Date of entry/update: 03 June 2003


    Title: The Rise and Fall of General Ne Win
    Date of publication: September 1997
    Description/subject: Bio-chronology 1947-1988
    Language: English
    Source/publisher: "The Irrawaddy", Vol. 5. No.6
    Format/size: html
    Date of entry/update: 03 June 2003


    Title: Letter to General Ne Win from U Aung Gyi
    Date of publication: August 1997
    Description/subject: Rangoon May 1, 1992 Through a series of open letters to Ne Win and former members of the Revolutionary Council written between 1988 and 1992, U Aung Gyi criticized the economic policies and human rights abuses of the government. The following excerpts are from one of these letters.
    Language: English
    Source/publisher: "Burma Debate", Vol.. IV, No. 3
    Format/size: html
    Date of entry/update: 03 June 2003


  • U Tin Oo (NLD)

    Individual Documents

    Title: U Tin Oo (NLD)
    Date of publication: 16 December 2010
    Language: English
    Source/publisher: Wikipedia
    Format/size: html
    Date of entry/update: 16 December 2010