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Panglong Peace Conference

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Title: 2016 Panglong Conference (Wikipedia)
Description/subject: "The 2016 Panglong Conference, officially known as the Union Peace Conference 21st Century Panglong (Burmese: ပြည်ထောင်စု ငြိမ်းချမ်းရေးညီလာခံ ၂၁ ရာစု ပင်လုံ) is an upcoming peace conference which began on 31 Aug 2016 in Myanmar Convention Centre 2 of Naypyidaw, Myanmar. The first Panglong Conference was held in the Panglong region of British Burma in 1947, and was negotiated between Aung San and ethnic leaders. Despite several meetings between ethnic insurgent groups and the government prior to the Panglong Conference in 2016, it is unclear how many of them will actually attend. Eighteen ethnic insurgent groups are expected to attend the conference, whilst three ethnic insurgent groups (The Arakan Army, the Myanmar National Democratic Alliance Army, and the Ta'ang National Liberation Army) are not expected to attend.Ban Ki-moon, the Secretary-General of the United Nations also attended the opening ceremony..."
Language: English
Source/publisher: Wikipedia
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 31 August 2016


Title: Google search results for "Panglong Peace Conference"
Description/subject: 48,700 results, 31 August 2016
Language: English
Source/publisher: Google
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 31 August 2016


Title: Google site-specific search for "panglong conference" on "the irrawaddy"
Language: English
Source/publisher: "The Irrawaddy" via Google
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 31 August 2016


Title: Google site-specific search for "panglong conference" on mmtimes.com
Language: English
Source/publisher: "Myanmar Times" via Google
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 31 August 2016


Individual Documents

Title: Union Peace Conference: 21st Panglong
Date of publication: 01 September 2016
Description/subject: Substantial coverage of the Conference. Includes full reports on and texts of speeches..."Welcome to 'The Myanmar Times' coverage of the Union Peace Conference, the cornerstone effort of the new National League for Democracy government-led peace process. Dubbed the '21st Century Panglong Conference' in reference to the landmark 1947 summit led by independence hero Bogyoke Aung San, the Union Peace Conference will be held in Nay Pyi Taw over 5 days, beginning August 31, and will bring together armed ethnic groups, political parties, military officials, and government representatives. The NLD campaigned heavily on the importance of "national reconciliation" and has identified the peace process as bedrock effort of its opening agenda, but the new government has also indicated that it sees the conference as only a starting point in an ongoing political dialogue with Myanmar's many ethnic and military players. Scroll below to see our live coverage, or click here to read background and analysis. You can also stream the opening of today's Panglong conference on MRTV here!..."
Language: English
Source/publisher: "Myanmar Times"
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 01 September 2016


Title: Panglong 21 and the long search for peace
Date of publication: 31 August 2016
Description/subject: "The 21st Century Panglong conference is a symbolic step toward peace and national reconciliation, but huge challenges remain....It's been a long time since the guns of war were silent in Myanmar. Fighting erupted within months of independence in 1948, when the Communist Party of Burma launched an armed rebellion against the government. Since then, numerous armed groups have formed, allied and splintered, leading to one of the world’s most complex and long-running civil wars. The military coup in 1988 ushered in a period of respite. The following year, the head of Military Intelligence, Lieutenant-General Khin Nyunt, began negotiating a series of ceasefire agreements. In reality most were “gentlemen’s agreements”; one of the only formal ceasefires was signed with the Kachin Independence Organisation in February 1994. Many of the groups that signed the agreements were allowed to keep their arms and maintain some form of territorial control. But the lack of a substantive political settlement left the process vulnerable to backsliding into conflict. The arrival of the Thein Sein-led government in 2011 marked a new and more ambitious phase, in which a multilateral ceasefire and political negotiations were introduced. Despite facing substantial obstacles, it has achieved some success, most notably the Nationwide Ceasefire Agreement signed last October by eight ethnic armed groups. While its legitimacy has been brought into question by the refusal of most leading armed groups to sign, the NCA has been retained by the National League for Democracy government as the foundation of the peace process. State Counsellor Daw Aung San Suu Kyi has been a driving force behind the 21st Century Panglong Union Peace Conference, which opened in Nay Pyi Taw on August 31. She said in January that the peace process would be a major priority for her National League for Democracy government after it took office, and it would strive for an all-inclusive agreement. At the time of going to print, most ethnic armed groups involved in the process, including signatories and non-signatories of the NCA, were expected to attend the Panglong conference. This broad participation – particularly the re-engagement of NCA non-signatories with the political dialogue process – is likely to be the most substantive outcome of the conference, according to observers..."
Author/creator: Oliver Slow (text), Steve Tickner (photos)
Language: English
Source/publisher: "Frontier Myanmar"
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 31 August 2016


Title: Two peace conferences, one crucial difference
Date of publication: 27 August 2016
Description/subject: "The big difference between President U Thein Sein’s Union Peace Conference early this year and the 21st Century Panglong Conference is inclusion...AS GUIDED by State Counsellor Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, the 21st Century Panglong Conference will convene for the first time on August 31. It will be the first because it will re-convene at intervals of not more than six months. Now that important decisions have been made about convening the conference, we can imagine the shape and form of this historic event. This week I would like to discuss what can be expected from the 21st Century Panglong conference and how it will differ from the Union Peace Conference held by President U Thein Sein in January. The most important difference between the two conferences involves the participants. The main participants in the Union Peace Conference held by Thein Sein’s administration were past or serving military officers from the government or the parliament and the eight armed ethnic groups, including the Karen National Union, that signed the Nationwide Ceasefire Agreement last October. The 21st Century Panglong event will bring together representatives from the government and the parliament, most of whom are members of the National League for Democracy elected in its landslide victory last November, along with Tatmadaw officers, signatories and non-signatories of the NCA, and members of civil society groups. It will be an unprecedented, genuinely all-inclusive peace conference. Another important difference involves the classification and status of participants. At the Union Peace Conference, only signatories of the NCA were recognised as delegates and representatives of non-signatory groups were invited to attend as observers. In protest against what they called discrimination, most non-signatory groups boycotted the five-day event..."
Author/creator: Sithu Aung Myint
Language: English
Source/publisher: "Frontier Myanmar"
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 31 August 2016


Title: Everybody should be part of Panglong
Date of publication: 26 August 2016
Description/subject: "Next Wednesday Burma will hold the “21st Century Panglong Conference” — the latest step in the country’s long peace process. It will be a moment imbued with symbolism. In 1947, Aung San Suu Kyi’s father, General Aung San, led the Burma delegation at the first Panglong Conference which reached a breakthrough agreement with three armed groups and is still etched in the popular memory of the country today. A lot is at stake with this Panglong Conference. As with the peace process generally in Burma, this is the opportunity to transform the country, into a state the people of Burma have wanted for several decades. But to do so it must be fully inclusive. Getting all of the ethnic armed organisations (EAOs) to the table is a major challenge in itself. There remain three groups, still in active combat, that were excluded from discussions on the Nationwide Ceasefire Agreement (NCA) and how they will participate in the Panglong Conference is still confusing. There has been much focus on the inclusion of these groups and this is important, especially given human rights violations which are particularly prevalent in areas of continuing conflict. But inclusivity is about more than just political players; it is also about all stakeholders. Experiences in other countries have shown time and time again the need for women to play an equal part, for grassroots organisations and civil society to have a strong voice and for information to be freely available for the people to follow developments. These are the ingredients for a sustainable, inclusive process which can propel the country forward and into the prosperous future for all. Unfortunately, during my recent visit to Burma I saw signs that the peace process risked neglecting these fundamental aspects. Burma has only a couple of days before the Panglong Conference and quick changes should be made to ensure these vital aspects are addressed..."
Author/creator: Yanghee Lee
Language: English
Source/publisher: "Democratic Voice of Burma" (DVB)
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 31 August 2016