VL.png The World-Wide Web Virtual Library
[WWW VL database || WWW VL search]
donations.gif asia-wwwvl.gif

Online Burma/Myanmar Library

Full-Text Search | Database Search | What's New | Alphabetical List of Subjects | Main Library | Reading Room | Burma Press Summary

Home > Main Library > Military (Tatmadaw), Military Intelligence and police > Arms (Military Expenditure, Arms Transfers, Arms Production Etc)

Order links by: Reverse Date Title

Arms (Military Expenditure, Arms Transfers, Arms Production Etc)

Websites/Multiple Documents

Title: "BurmaNet News" Guns archive
Description/subject: Archive from 2004
Language: English
Source/publisher: Various sources via "BurmaNet News"
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 18 April 2012


Title: Search results for Burma on the ICBL site
Language: English
Source/publisher: International Campaign to Ban Landmines (ICBL)
Format/size: html, pdf
Date of entry/update: 28 February 2010


Title: Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI)
Language: English
Source/publisher: SIPRI
Format/size: Register and look for tables of arms expenditure, etc.
Alternate URLs: See also the SIPRI Military Expenditure Database
http://milexdata.sipri.org/
http://www.sipri.org/databases/milex
Date of entry/update: 03 June 2003


Individual Documents

Title: ALLEGED NORTH KOREAN INVOLVEMENT IN MISSILE
Date of publication: 27 August 2004
Description/subject: SUMMARY: "North Korean workers are reportedly assembling “SAM missiles” and constructing an underground facility at a Burmese military site in Magway Division, about 315 miles NNW of Rangoon, according to XXXXXXXXXXXX . This unsolicited account should not be taken as authoritative, but it tracks with other information garnered and reported via XXXXXXXXXXXX. End Summary."
Language: English
Source/publisher: US Embassy, Rangoon, via Wikileaks
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 24 December 2010


Title: “Strong and Fast”: German Arms in Burma
Date of publication: November 2007
Description/subject: "...The inner conflicts that have been ravaging Burma broke out long before its independence of 1948. Hundreds of Thousands got killed or maimed ever since, Millions were forced to flee their homes. All warring parties – government troops, a multitude of rebels and drug lords – recruit child soldiers; the so called small arms serve in fact as weapons of mass destruction. The recent commentaries of Western media criticise China as the most important arms supplier of the military dictatorship. Unfortunately, this criticism covers up the fact that West Germany used to be the main military partner of Burma for decades..." "Die inneren Konflikte Birmas begannen weit vor der Unabhängigkeit von 1948. Hunderttausende wurden seither getötet, Millionen vertrieben. Alle Kriegsparteien – Regierung, untereinander verfeindete Rebellen und Drogenbarone – setzen Kindersoldaten ein, gemordet wird in erster Linie mit "Kleinwaffen". In den jüngsten Berichten westlicher Medien wurde vor allem China als Waffenlieferant der Militärdiktatur kritisiert. Darüber wird aber vergessen, dass jahrzehntelang just die Bundesrepublik Deutschland Birmas wichtigster Rüstungspartner war:..."
Author/creator: Roman Deckert
Language: English, Deutsch, German
Source/publisher: Berlin Information-center for Transatlantic Security (BITS)
Format/size: html
Alternate URLs: http://www.bits.de/public/articles/kleinwaffen-nl11-07.htm
Date of entry/update: 21 November 2007


Title: Burma (Myanmar) country profile on Landmine and Cluster Munition Monitor (Update 2012-10-02)
Date of publication: 02 October 2012
Description/subject: Mine Ban Policy; Casualties and Victim Assistance; Cluster Munition Ban Policy; Support for Mine Action; Mine Action; Complete Profile.
Language: English
Source/publisher: Landmine and Cluster Munition Monitor (2 October 2012 update)
Format/size: html
Alternate URLs: http://www.the-monitor.org/index.php/publications/display?url=lm/2006/burma.html
http://www.icbl.org/index.php/icbl/content/view/full/2
Date of entry/update: 11 December 2010


Title: Burma and North Korea: Smoke or fire?
Date of publication: 24 August 2009
Description/subject: Conclusion: "On security-related issues, Burma and North Korea are well known as information black holes. Given the isolated and secretive nature of both regimes, it is very difficult to determine the precise nature of their relationship. Also, both countries are at the centre of emotive and highly politicised debates about human rights, nuclear proliferation and regional security. The picture is clouded by rumours and speculative stories circulated in the news media and on activist websites. There is the danger too of individuals and groups deliberately encouraging anti-Naypyidaw or anti-Pyongyang sentiments, for partisan political reasons. Any suggestions of a secret WMD program, however, let alone one conducted by a rogue state like Burma, must be cause for serious concern. Some of the information that has leaked out of Burma appears credible, and in recent years other snippets of information have emerged which, taken together, must raise suspicions. Also, no-one underestimates the lengths to which Burma's military leaders will go to stay in power, and to protect the country from perceived external threats. With this in mind, many observers are looking to the IAEA or the Obama Administration to settle Burma's nuclear status once and for all. The Burmese JADE (Junta's Anti-Democratic Efforts) Act enacted by Congress in July 2008 stipulates that, within 180 days, the Secretary of State must issue a statement describing ‘the provision of weapons of mass destruction and related materials, capabilities, and technology, including nuclear, chemical, and dual'. Reports filtering out of Washington in recent months suggest that there have already been a number of confidential briefings to senior officials on this subject. However, the world is still waiting for an authoritative public statement from the US which will put all the rumours, blogs and newspaper stories into their proper perspective. There has always been a lot of smoke surrounding Burma's nuclear ambitions. Since June, the amount of smoke has increased, but still no-one seems to know whether or not it hides a real fire. As time passes, the need to find an answer to this important question can only increase."
Author/creator: Andrew Selth
Language: English
Source/publisher: Australian Strategic Policy Institute Limited
Format/size: pdf (249K)
Alternate URLs: http://www.burmalibrary.org/docs07/Policy_Analysis47.pdf
Date of entry/update: 25 August 2009


Title: Burma and Nuclear Proliferation: Policies and perceptions
Date of publication: May 2007
Description/subject: Executive Summary" Before 2000, the idea that Burma might one day become a nuclear power was considered fanciful. Ever since it regained its independence in 1948, Burma had been a consistent supporter of global nuclear disarmament and had played an active role in international organisations dedicated to that end. Nor could it claim the strategic rationale, economic strength or technological expertise to support a nuclear industry, let alone develop a nuclear weapon. Yet, in 2000, the ruling State Peace and Development Council announced that it planned to purchase a small nuclear reactor from Russia. Construction was due to begin in 2003, but was repeatedly postponed, probably due to financial problems. A new agreement was signed in May 2007. The response to the regime’s announcement of a nuclear research program was almost uniformly negative. There was widespread scepticism that Burma could manage such a complex and demanding project, a sentiment shared by the International Atomic Energy Agency. There were also concerns that Burma would be unable to keep secure any radioactive materials produced by the program. There were even claims that the regime secretly planned to use the reactor to build a nuclear weapon. These claims were rightly dismissed as far-fetched and self-serving, but they seemed to be given some substance in 2003 by reports that Burma was developing close links with North Korea, a notorious proliferator of nuclear and ballistic missile technology. Despite the lack of any supporting evidence, some activist groups claim that Burma already possesses nuclear weapons and the means to deliver them. It is highly unlikely that Burma currently has any intention of acquiring nuclear weapons, from North Korea or anywhere else. Claims that it might try to do so in the future are equally speculative, but are made a little more credible by Burma’s exaggerated threat perceptions. Ever since the armed forces took back direct power in 1988, the regime has been the target of a range of external pressures, including from some of the world’s most powerful countries. The aggressive rhetoric that has accompanied these pressures, and the support openly shown for Burma’s opposition movement, has helped create a siege mentality among Burma’s leaders. Even now, they fear intervention by the United States and its allies – possibly even an invasion – to restore democracy to Burma. These concerns have already prompted the regime to consider the acquisition of ballistic missiles. There have also been suggestions that a few Burmese generals envy North Korea’s apparent ability to use its nuclear weapons capabilities to fend off its enemies and win concessions from the international community. It is important not to over-react to these reports. Even if confirmed, they probably reflect the views of a very small minority in Burma’s military hierarchy. Such reports, however, illustrate the scope for misperceptions, on both sides, which can lead in turn to policy errors and even more serious misunderstandings.
Author/creator: Andrew Selth
Language: English
Source/publisher: Griffith Asia Institute
Format/size: pdf (214K)
Date of entry/update: 31 May 2007


Title: Burma Making Small Arms
Date of publication: August 1998
Description/subject: Despite economic crisis and simmering social unrest, Burma's military leaders have continued to purchase more arms and ammunition over the past decade. With over 300,000 soldiers, and no external threats, the generals are determined to expand and maintain the largest army in Southeast Asia. Burma has begun manufacturing small arms, and possibly ordnance... [Sources: Bangkok Post, The Nation]
Language: English
Source/publisher: "The Irrawaddy", Vol. 6, No. 4
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 03 June 2003


Title: Burma's Missile Dream
Date of publication: August 2009
Description/subject: Naypyidaw appears to be intent on setting up a missile defense sytem to deter po tential enemies... "Is Snr-Gen Than Shwe delusional? Subordinates of Burma's paramount leader are said to have repeatedly heard him say how much he admires North Korea's use of missile technology to bully and defy its neighbors and the West. The bad news is that Than Shwe's hard-line military leaders and ministers may agree with him. However, Burmese opposition groups in exile suspect that army officers who disagree with Than Shwe's policy deliberately leaked secret documents to exiled media groups, including The Irrawaddy. These documents throw light on Burma's military ties with Pyongyang..."
Author/creator: Aung Zaw
Language: English
Source/publisher: "The Irrawaddy" Vol. 17, No. 5
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 26 December 2009


Title: Burma's nuclear bomb alive and ticking/Time for a close look at Burma's nuclear programme
Date of publication: 02 August 2009
Description/subject: 2 linked articles.... Talk to regional security authorities or their embassy staff about Burma having a nuclear programme and it usually generates two responses - total disbelief or horror. Strategic defence studies expert Professor Desmond Ball and journalist Phil Thornton spent two years investigating rumours, speculation, misinformation and the small truths that all help to conceal the Burmese military regime's nuclear ambitions from serious examination
Author/creator: Desmond Ball, Phil Thornton
Language: English
Source/publisher: "Bangkok Post" (Spectrum)
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 25 August 2009


Title: Council Regulation (EC) No 1081/2000 of 22 May 2000 Prohibiting the Sale, Supply and Export to Burma/Myanmar of Equipment Which Might be Used for Internal Repression Or Terrorism, and Freezing the Funds of Certain Persons Related to Important Governmental
Date of publication: 22 May 2000
Description/subject: Full text
Language: English
Source/publisher: European Council
Format/size: pdf (148K)
Alternate URLs: http://eur-lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/LexUriServ.do?uri=CELEX:32000R1081:en:NOT
Date of entry/update: 03 June 2003


Title: EU Toughens Sanctions Against Burma
Date of publication: 25 May 2000
Description/subject: European Union (EU) foreign affairs ministers and the EU Commission have agreed to implement a range of "restrictive measures" against Burma, including strengthening an existing visa ban and freezing assets held abroad by persons to whom the ban applies.
Author/creator: Brian Kenety
Language: English
Source/publisher: Asia Times
Date of entry/update: 03 June 2003


Title: Exploring Claims about Secret Nuclear Sites in Myanmar
Date of publication: 28 January 2010
Description/subject: "...Overall, the lack of specifics about many of the sites mentioned in the reports from opposition groups and defectors makes independent analysis using commercial satellite imagery very difficult. Those reporting the existence of secret nuclear sites in Burma should provide more direct and specific evidence, in addition to geographical coordinates, in order for some of the sites to be further investigated. ISIS does not want to overweigh the importance of debunking a few claims about secret nuclear activities in Burma. There remain valid suspicions about the existence of undeclared nuclear activities in Myanmar, particularly in the context of cooperation between Myanmar and North Korea. But the methods used in the public so far to allege secret nuclear facilities are flawed. Identification of suspect nuclear sites requires a more rigorous basis than is currently evident..."
Author/creator: Robert Kelley, Andrea Scheel Stricker and Paul Brannan
Language: English
Source/publisher: Institute for Science and International Security (ISIS)
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 01 February 2010


Title: India Woos Burma with Weapons for Gas
Date of publication: January 2007
Description/subject: New Delhi's eagerness to supply Burma with weapons highlights new quid pro quo policies... "Increased contacts between senior military chiefs o­n both sides of the Burma-India border, involving Indian weapons sales, are believed by analysts to have two primary objectives: to help flush out Burma-based Indian insurgents and to counter growing Chinese influence in Naypyidaw. But the sale of arms and related technical equipment is also likely to be linked to New Delhi"Look East" economic policy, including ambitions to buy huge quantities of Burma's offshore gas in the Bay of Bengal. If the gas bid—against rivals China and Thailand—is successful, it will also involve building a costly pipeline through rebel-infested areas of northwest Burma and northeast India..."
Author/creator: Aung Lwin Oo
Language: English
Source/publisher: "The Irrawaddy" Vol. 15, No. 1
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 26 July 2008


Title: Israelis Helping to Produce Arms in Burma
Date of publication: 28 July 1998
Description/subject: Israeli consultants are helping Myanmar, formerly Burma, produce small arms and ordnance in a prefabricated factory built in Singapore, the London-based Jane's Defense Weekly said yesterday.
Author/creator: Arieh O'Sullivan
Language: English
Source/publisher: Jerusalem Post
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 11 December 2010


Title: Junta Buys 230 Military Aircraft in 21 Years
Date of publication: 26 December 2009
Description/subject: With its recent purchase of 20 MiG-29 fighter jets, Burma's military junta has acquired a total of 230 military aircraft since seizing power in a bloody coup in 1988—nearly 100 more than the regime of former dictator Ne Win.
Author/creator: Wai Moe
Language: English
Source/publisher: "The Irrawaddy"
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 28 December 2009


Title: Landmine chapter of the Burma Human Rights Yearbook 2000
Date of publication: October 2001
Description/subject: "Landmines are weapons that kill and maim indiscriminately, whether it be civilians, soldiers, elderly, women, children or animals and cause injury and death long after the official end of a war. Contrary to trends in the rest of the world, rather than reduce or abolish the use of landmines, the SPDC has actually increased production of anti-personnel landmines and at least in the case of the Burma-Bangladesh border, is actively maintaining minefields. In Asia, Burma is currently second only to Afghanistan in the number of new landmine victims, surpassing even Cambodia and the SPDC was one of only three government military forces in Asia to use anti-personnel landmines in 2000, the others being Sri Lanka and Pakistan..."
Language: English
Source/publisher: Human Rights Documentation Unit, NCGUB
Format/size: html
Alternate URLs: Yearbook main page: http://www.ibiblio.org/obl/docs/yearbooks/Main.htm
Date of entry/update: 03 June 2003


Title: Landmine chapter of the Burma Human Rights Yearbook 2001-2002
Date of publication: September 2002
Description/subject: "Landmines are weapons that kill and maim indiscriminately, whether it be civilians, soldiers, elderly people, women, children or animals. They cause injury and death long after the official end of a war. Contrary to trends in the rest of the world, rather than reduce or abolish the use of landmines, the SPDC has actually increased production of anti-personnel landmines and at least in the case of the Burma-Bangladesh border, is actively maintaining minefields. In Asia, Burma is currently second only to Afghanistan in the number of new landmine victims, surpassing even Cambodia. The SPDC has not signed the Mine Ban Treaty and abstained from the 1999 UN General Assembly vote on the treaty, saying, “A sweeping ban on landmines is unnecessary and unjustified. The problem is the indiscriminate use of mines, as well as the transfer of them.” Although the SPDC is not known to export landmines, mines from China, Israel, Italy, Russia and the United States have been found planted inside Burma, indicating past or present importation of them. By their own admission, accepting transferred (imported) landmines makes them part of the problem..."
Language: English
Source/publisher: Human Rights Documentation Unit of the NCGUB
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 03 June 2003


Title: Landmine Monitor Report 2000: Burma (Myanmar)
Date of publication: August 2000
Description/subject: "Key developments March 1999-May 2000: Government forces and at least ten ethnic armed groups continue to lay antipersonnel landmines in significant numbers. Landmine Monitor estimates there were approximately 1,500 new mine victims in 1999. The Committee Representing the People's Parliament endorsed the Mine Ban Treaty in January 2000." Includes chart of Ethnic Political Organizations with Armed Wings in Burma.
Language: English, Burmese
Source/publisher: International Campaign to Ban Landmines (ICBL)
Format/size: html (English); pdf (Burmese, 200K)
Alternate URLs: http://www.burmalibrary.org/docs09/LandmineMonitor00Bur.pdf
Date of entry/update: 25 July 2010


Title: Landmine Monitor Report 2001: Burma (Myanmar)
Date of publication: 12 September 2001
Description/subject: "Key developments since May 2000: Myanmar government forces and at least eleven ethnic armed groups continue to lay antipersonnel mines in significant numbers. The governments of Bangladesh and Thailand both protested use of mines by Myanmar forces inside their respective countries. In a disturbing new development, mine use is alleged to be taking place under the direction of loggers and narcotics traffickers, as well as by government and rebel forces."
Language: English, Burmese
Source/publisher: ICBL
Format/size: html, pdf
Alternate URLs: http://www.the-monitor.org/lm/2001/print/lm2001_burma_burmese.pdf
Date of entry/update: 03 June 2003


Title: Landmine Monitor Report 2002: Burma (Myanmar)
Date of publication: 13 September 2002
Description/subject: "Key developments since May 2001: Myanmar?s military has continued laying landmines inside the country and along its borders with Thailand. As part of a new plan to ?fence the country,? the Coastal Region Command Headquarters gave orders to its troops from Tenasserim division to lay mines along the Thai-Burma border. Three rebel groups, not previously identified as mine users, were discovered using landmines in 2002: Pao People?s Liberation Front, All Burma Muslim Union and Wa National Army. Thirteen rebel groups are now using mines. Myanmar?s ruling State Peace and Development Council (SPDC) has not acceded to the Mine Ban Treaty. Myanmar abstained from voting on the pro-Mine Ban Treaty UN General Assembly Resolution 56/24M in November 2001. SPDC delegates have not attended any of the annual meetings of States Parties to the Mine Ban Treaty or the intersessional Standing Committee meetings. Myanmar declined to attend the Regional Seminar of Stockpile Destruction of Anti-personnel Mines and other Munitions, held in Malaysia in August 2001. Myanmar did not respond to an invitation by the government of Malaysia to an informal meeting, held on the side of the January 2002 intersessional meetings in Geneva, to discuss the issue of landmines within the ASEAN context (other ASEAN non-signatories, such as Vietnam, did attend). Myanmar was one of the two ASEAN countries that did not participate in the seminar, ?Landmines in Southeast Asia,? hosted by Thailand from 13?15 May 2002. However, two observers from the Myanmar Ministry of Health attended the Regional Workshop on Victim Assistance in the Framework of the Mine Ban Treaty, held in Thailand from 6-8 November 2001, sponsored by Handicap International (HI). One health officer attending the meeting acknowledged that if Myanmar joined the mine ban it would be a good preventative health measure..."
Language: English, Burmese
Source/publisher: International Campaign to Ban Landmines (ICBL)
Format/size: html, pdf
Date of entry/update: 03 June 2003


Title: Landmine Monitor Report 2003: Burma (Myanmar)
Date of publication: 09 September 2003
Description/subject: Key developments since May 2002: "Myanmar’s military has continued laying landmines. At least 15 rebel groups also used mines, two more than last year: the New Mon State Party and the Hongsawatoi Restoration Party. Nobel Peace Laureate Jody Williams and ICBL Coordinator Liz Bernstein visited the country in February 2003."..."Myanmar’s ruling State Peace and Development Council (SPDC) has not acceded to the Mine Ban Treaty. Myanmar abstained from voting on the pro-Mine Ban Treaty UN General Assembly Resolution 57/74 in November 2002. SPDC delegates have not attended any of the annual meetings of States Parties to the Mine Ban Treaty or the intersessional Standing Committee meetings...Myanmar has been producing at least three types of antipersonnel mines: MM1, MM2, and Claymore-type mines...Myanmar’s military forces have used landmines extensively throughout the long running civil war...Nine out of fourteen states and divisions in Burma are mine-affected, with a heavy concentration in East Burma. Mines have been laid heavily in the Eastern Pegu Division in order to prevent insurgents from reaching central Burma. Mines have also been laid extensively to the east of the area between Swegin and Kyawgyi...No humanitarian demining activities have been implemented in Burma...SPDC military units operating in areas suspected of mine contamination have repeatedly been accused of forcing people, compelled to serve as porters, to walk in front of patrols in order to detonate mines..."
Language: English, Burmese
Source/publisher: International Campaign to Ban Landmines (ICBL)
Format/size: html, pdf
Date of entry/update: 09 September 2003


Title: Landmine Monitor Report 2004: Burma (Myanmar)
Date of publication: October 2004
Description/subject: Key developments since May 2003: Myanmar"atrocity demining,"Halt Mine Use in Burma."... * Mine Ban Policy * Use; * Production, Transfer, Stockpiling; * Non-State Actors Use; * NSA-Production, Transfer, Stockpiling; * Landmine Problem; * Mine Clearance and Mine Risk Education; * Landmine Casualties68; * Survivor Assistance90; * Disability Policy and Practice.
Language: English, Burmese
Source/publisher: International campaign to ban landmines
Format/size: html (English); pdf (Burmese, 157K)
Date of entry/update: 20 November 2004


Title: Landmines in Burma, The Military Dimension
Date of publication: November 2000
Description/subject: "...A wide range of anti-personnel (AP) and anti-vehicle (AV) landmines have been used in Burma over the years. Details are hard to obtain, but it would appear that before 1988 the Burma Army had access to common Eastern-bloc stake-mounted fragmentation mines such as the Soviet-designed POMZ-2 and POMZ-2M.4 (China also makes versions of these mines, designated the Type 58 and Type 59 respectively.) Over the past few years the Tatmadaw's supplies of these mines have apparently been boosted by a locally produced version of the POMZ-2, designated the MM-1. Another kind of stake-mounted fragmentation mine, quite similar in appearance to the POMZ-2 and POMZ-2M, has also been made and used in Burma in the past, but has yet to be fully identified...". This is an excerpt from Working Paper No. 352 of the same title, published by the Strategic Defense Studies Centre of the Australian National University, Canberra, November 2000.
Author/creator: Andrew Selth
Language: English
Source/publisher: "Burma Debate", Vol. VII, No. 4, Winter 2000
Date of entry/update: 03 June 2003


Title: Myanmar's Forgotten Minefields
Date of publication: 01 October 2000
Language: English
Source/publisher: Jane's Intelligence Review
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 03 June 2003


Title: Myanmar, North Korea stay brothers in arms
Date of publication: 05 September 2013
Description/subject: "If a press statement from the US Department of Defense is to be believed, President Barack Obama is quite pleased with the reform process underway in Myanmar, especially recent progress ''that's been made on human rights''. The message was conveyed by US Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel in late August when he met with his counterparts from the 10 member states of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) in Brunei, including Lieutenant-General Wai Lwin, the current defense minister of Myanmar, a former pariah state turned darling of the West. But there was an important caveat in Hagel's statement that indicated Washington's main concern in Myanmar is not democracy and human rights. Rather, he stressed ''it's important that Myanmar sever ties with North Korea''. Evidently Myanmar has not rolled back relations with Pyongyang despite persistent pressure from Washington, including during then secretary of state Hillary Clinton's historic visit to Myanmar in December 2011, and believed behind-the-scenes prodding from Japan and South Korea..."
Author/creator: Bertil Lintner
Language: English
Source/publisher: "Asia Times Online"
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 29 May 2014


Title: Myanmar: Beneath The Surface (video)
Date of publication: 23 December 2009
Description/subject: "Two years ago the world watched in dismay as Myanmar's military junta brutally crushed the so-called Saffron Revolution. It was the only show of mass opposition to have occurred inside the country in almost 20 years. Filmmaker Hazel Chandler entered the country undercover for People & Power to find out how Myanmar's people are fairing, and to investigate disturbing claims that the regime may be trying to develop nuclear weapons."
Author/creator: Hazel Chandler
Language: English
Source/publisher: Al Jazeera (People and Power)
Format/size: Adobe Flash (23 minutes)
Date of entry/update: 25 December 2009


Title: Pariah Partners in Arms
Date of publication: March 2004
Description/subject: "It has long been suspected that North Korea supplies Burma with weapons. But recent unconfirmed reports that the two secretive states are negotiating a nuclear deal are unsettling... Bilateral relations between Burma and North Korea were severed in 1983, after Pyongyang sent agents to Rangoon to conduct a terrorist attack against a visiting South Korean presidential delegation. Diplomatic ties have still not been restored. Over the past few years, however, these two economically stricken but highly militarized pariah states seem to have found some common ground. Depending on how it develops, this relationship could extend beyond mutual support to have wider strategic implications. Reports that the Rangoon regime has sought to acquire strategic weapon systems like submarines and ballistic missiles from Pyongyang have aroused concern in regional capitals and in Washington. There have even been suggestions that North Korea is secretly helping Burma to build a nuclear reactor, raising the spectre of a future atomic weapons program that could be used by Rangoon as a bargaining chip against the United States..."
Author/creator: Andrew Selth
Language: English
Source/publisher: "The Irrawaddy" Vol. 12, No. 3
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 09 June 2004


Title: Shopping for
Date of publication: July 2001
Description/subject: An illegal trade in live ammunition is thriving in Burma, where soldiers—often traded like commodities themselves—are selling anything they can to supplement their meager incomes... "Sergeant Hla Maung wanders cautiously into Mingaladon market and walks toward a small shop run by a friend of his. His friend smiles at him when he stops in front of the shop, and the sergeant gives him an inquiring look. On display in the shop is a mass of military equipment, such as uniforms and boots, stored in a big dirty showcase..."
Author/creator: Maung Maung Oo
Language: English
Source/publisher: "The Irrawaddy", Vol 9. No. 6
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 04 May 2008


Title: Stark und schnell: Deutsche Waffen in Birma
Date of publication: November 2007
Description/subject: Dem Informationsdienst Jane´s zufolge setzt die birmanische Armee noch immer massiv auf die "Braut des deutschen Soldaten", die bis vor wenigen Jahren ihre Standardwaffe Nr. 1 war, und auf MG3-Maschinengewehre von Rheinmetall. Das FAL war nach Angaben des renommierten Experten Edward Ezell einst aus Altbeständen der Bundeswehr eingeführt worden; Waffenlieferungen nach Burma; Rolle Fritz Werners in Birma; Rolle der Bundesrepublik Deutschland in Birma; German Arms transfers to Burma; Role of German Government in Burma; Role of the Fritz Werner Company in Burma
Author/creator: Roman Deckert
Language: German, Deutsch
Source/publisher: Berliner Informationszentrum fur transantlantische Sicherheit (BITS)
Format/size: html (10k)
Alternate URLs: http://www.bits.de/public/articles/kleinwaffen-nl11-07.htm
http://www.bits.de/frames/publibd.htm
Date of entry/update: 05 December 2007


Title: The Arms Keep Coming—But Who Pays?
Date of publication: June 2004
Description/subject: "The Burmese military’s appetite for weapons appears insatiable. William Ashton details the regime’s recent purchases..."
Author/creator: William Ashton
Language: English
Source/publisher: "The Irrawaddy" Vol. 12, No. 6
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 07 October 2004


Title: The Kiev Connection
Date of publication: April 2004
Description/subject: "The former Soviet republic of the Ukraine is helping to satisfy the Rangoon regime’s apparently insatiable demand for modern weapon systems..." In May 2003 the Malyshev HMB plant in Kharkov reportedly signed a contract with Rangoon to provide the Burma Army with 1,000 new BTR-3U light armored personnel carriers, or APCs. The APCs will be supplied in component form over the next 10 years, and assembled in Burma. The size of the deal is estimated to be in excess of US $500 million. It is not known if it will be paid in hard currency, or whether an element of barter trade is involved. Some of Burma’s other arms suppliers—for example Russia and North Korea—have accepted part payment in rice, teak and marine products..."
Author/creator: William Ashton
Language: English
Source/publisher: "The Irrawaddy" Vol. 12, No. 4, April 2004
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 22 July 2004


Title: U.S.-UKRAINE NONPROLIFERATION MEETINGS SEPTEMBER
Date of publication: 09 November 2009
Description/subject: "... Nykonenko said that Ukraine had received the U.S. demarche and was no longer exporting weapons to Burma. Ukraine was just wrapping up existing contracts, and had been reducing its exports to Burma since 2005. In 2008 Ukrainian exports to Burma were ‘as good as zero’ in part due to previous U.S. warnings, and Ukraine had not signed any new contracts with Burma in the last two and one half years. Current exports were just spare parts. The remaining business was so small that the company involved had recalled all of its workers from Burma..."
Language: English
Source/publisher: US Embassy, Kyiv, via Wikileaks
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 28 December 2010


Title: What's Behind Asean's Arms Race?
Date of publication: February 2010
Description/subject: Regional rivalry for energy resources and China’s growing shadow are driving massive spending on weapons in Southeast Asia...Burma is in dispute with neighboring Bangladesh over maritime boundaries in the Bay of Bengal, where both countries want to explore for gas. Their small navies have already confronted one another over an exploratory drilling rig authorized by the Burmese junta in waters claimed by the Bangladeshis...The Burmese regime, however, had bought 12 MiGs from Russia in 2001 following a border clash with Thailand, and announced its plan to purcahse a new fleet of MiG-29s only a few weeks after a trip to Burma by Chinese Vice President Xi Jinping, whose public comments about strengthening economic ties probably masked the real reason for his visit: to persuade the junta to buy Chinese planes instead of the Russian MiGs... Some have seen the move as part of an effort to reduce the regime’s reliance on Chinese support, particularly in the wake of last year’s attack on the Chinese-speaking Kokang ethnic minority, which sent some 37,000 refugees into China and earned the Burmese junta a rare rebuke from Beijing..."
Language: English
Source/publisher: "The Irrawaddy" Vol. 18, No. 2
Format/size: html
Alternate URLs: http://www2.irrawaddy.org/print_article.php?art_id=17689
Date of entry/update: 28 February 2010