VL.png The World-Wide Web Virtual Library
[WWW VL database || WWW VL search]
donations.gif asia-wwwvl.gif

Online Burma/Myanmar Library

Full-Text Search | Database Search | What's New | Alphabetical List of Subjects | Main Library | Reading Room | Burma Press Summary

Home > Main Library > Food Security > Food Security in Burma/Myanmar > Food Security and nutrition in Burma/Myanmar

Order links by: Reverse Date Title

Food Security and nutrition in Burma/Myanmar

Individual Documents

Title: UNDERNUTRITION IN MYANMAR Part 1: A Critical Review of Literature
Date of publication: March 2016
Description/subject: Abstract: "Despite improvements in recent years, the prevalence of undernutrition among women and children in Myanmar remains unacceptably high. One in three children are stunted and about 8% are acutely malnourished. Micronutrient deficiencies are common among infants, young children and pregnant women. In fact, more than 80% of children 6 to 23 months of age and 70% of pregnant women are anemic. To better understand the determinants of undernutrition and the linkages between food security, livelihoods and nutrition in Myanmar as a whole as well as in specific geographic areas where programs supported by the Livelihoods, Food Security Trust Fund (LIFT) are being implemented, the LEARN project has reviewed food and nutrition security data from the past five years and synthesized relevant findings into this user-friendly report. Guided by the conceptual framework of the determinants of undernutrition initially developed by UNICEF and adapted by the authors of the 2008 Lancet Series on Maternal and Child Undernutrition, this report presents what is known about the immediate determinants of undernutrition and how they are affected by underlying food security, caregiving, and environmental conditions, which are in turn shaped by income poverty, lack of access to capital and basic economic and social conditions. As the purpose of this report is as much to present what is known about food and nutrition security in Myanmar as it is to identify what is not known, the structure of the report is intended to highlight gaps in knowledge and areas for further research. Following the Introduction, Section 2 presents national level data on the food and nutrition security situation in Myanmar in the past five years. Sections 3, 4 and 5 present data on food and nutrition security from the various agro-ecological zones that are of interest to LIFT, namely the Coastal/Delta, Dry, and Uplands. Each section is organized in the same way, beginning with data on the prevalence of undernutrition in the geographic area, followed by findings on potential causes of undernutrition, organized according to immediate, underlying and basic determinants. This report will contribute to the overall knowledge base of the food and nutrition security sector as well as inform decisions related to the selection of interventions aimed at improving the nutritional status of families and communities in Myanmar."
Author/creator: Jennifer Cashin
Language: English
Source/publisher: LIFT-Fund
Format/size: pdf (3.4MB)
Alternate URLs: http://www.lift-fund.org/sites/lift-fund.org/files/uploads/Publications/LEARN_UnderNutrition-in-Mya...
Date of entry/update: 02 August 2016


Title: UNDERNUTRITION IN MYANMAR Part 2: A Secondary Analysis of LIFT 2013 Household Survey Data
Date of publication: March 2016
Description/subject: Executive Summary: "The multi-donor Livelihoods and Food Security Trust Fund (LIFT) commenced operations in Myanmar in 2010, supporting implementing partners (IPs) to assist poor families to increase their food availability and incomes in three of the country‘s main agro-ecological zones: the Uplands, Dry Zone, and Delta Zone. LIFT programming was later initiated in Rakhine State in the Coastal Zone. LIFT has funded a consortium of Save the Children (SCI), Action Contre la Faim (ACF) and Helen Keller International, to implement the LEARN project. The goal of this three-year project (December 2012 – December 2015) is to build the capacity of IPs and to provide technical support to LIFT to maximize the nutritional impact of their food security and livelihoods (FSL) programming throughout the country. In 2013, LIFT contracted ICF International, Inc., which worked with Myanmar Survey Research, to carry out its second household survey that included 2,400 LIFT households and 800 comparison households in 200 villages. In order to better understand the contributing factors of undernutrition in LIFT program areas and the links between child nutritional status and independent variables of programmatic importance to LIFT (such as income, livelihoods, food security, and water, sanitation and hygiene [WASH]), LEARN commissioned a secondary analysis of nutrition-related data from the 2013 LIFT Household Survey. The purpose of this report is to present the findings of this analysis."
Author/creator: Zaw Win and Jennifer Cashin
Language: English
Source/publisher: LIFT-Fund
Format/size: pdf (3.6MB)
Alternate URLs: http://www.lift-fund.org/under-nutrition-myanmar-part-2-secondary-analysis-lift-2013-household-surv...
Date of entry/update: 02 August 2016


Title: Vegetable Consumption, Preferences and Supply Chain Myanmar
Date of publication: July 2015
Description/subject: "In late March 2015, Making Vegetable Markets Work (MVMW) Program, implemented by Mercy Corps in partnership with Swisscontact, and the Dutch Economic Mission to Myanmar facilitated the establishment of the Vegetable Sector Acceleration Taskforce (VSAT) . The VSAT is a multistakeholder platform that convenes government, the private sector and development partners to help accelerate the development of Myanmar’s vegetable sector. The organisation aims to boost vegetable production and consumption by improving access to production knowledge, improving safe use of pesticides, developing a strong seed sector, reducing postharvest losses and improving existing markets and creating new markets for vegetables. Mercy Corps and its partners have collected considerable information on the vegetable production aspects of the supply chain that have helped them to identify challenges and opportunities related to improving vegetable production and efficiencies. While the organisations were aware that demand for vegetables was increasing, an information gap was to know more about consumers’ preferences for vegetables – how they perceived quality, their buying patterns, eating habits and perceptions towards chemicals and food safety. The research reported here is the first consumer preferences research of Myanmar’s vegetable sector...."
Language: English
Source/publisher: Mercy Corps
Format/size: pdf (1.2MB)
Alternate URLs: http://www.burmalibrary.org/docs22/Mercy_Corps-2015-07-Vegetable_Consumption-en.pdf
Date of entry/update: 31 July 2016


Title: Community Agriculture and Nutrition - Handbook (Burmese)
Date of publication: 2007
Description/subject: This Handbook is designed for both farmers and students to use in the field and during training. It is divided into eight sections, each one containing several topics and all illustrated with large clear pictures. The Handbook can be read from beginning to end or each topic can be read separately. Space is provided for readers to take notes and to add their own local knowledge...Our people have always been farmers. Farmers of the river lands, of the mountains, and of the forests. Due to civil war in Burma, more and more of us have migrated from our native lands and many now live in refugee camps along the Thai-Burmese border. The Royal Thai Government, its citizens, and non-government organisations have been very generous in their support to us. We have food, shelter, health care and education, and for this we are very thankful. But while we have been living in refugee camps we have slowly been losing our heritage, our wisdom, and our ways. For our children, rice comes from a warehouse, not grown on our own land by our own hands. In 1999, I asked the organisations that were already supporting us if they could help me look for ways to teach our children about agriculture and to help us live more self-sufficiently. The result of this is now called the CAN Project (Community Agriculture and Nutrition). This Handbook is the latest step in its ongoing development over 7 years with refugees and internally displaced people along the Thai-Burma border. There are many good books and resources on sustainable agriculture and we have learnt much from them. However refugees are constrained in their agricultural practices due to limited access to land, water and other resources. This Handbook attempts to present a summary of simple adaptations of ideas found in other books, manuals and resources on sustainable agriculture. This Handbook is not a textbook as such, but a compilation of different subjects for people to pick and choose. We know that it is not complete and I would ask anyone with ideas or suggestions to forward them so we can keep on learning. In the year 2000 I wrote a draft CAN Handbook. Then Jacob Thomson and I wrote the first CAN curriculum in 2001. Since then it has been used in training with nearly 5,000 school children, teachers, villagers, and staff of community-based and non-government organisations. Needless to say, since the first curriculum was drafted, we have had many experiences, learnt many lessons and made many changes.
Author/creator: David Saw Wah
Language: Burmese
Source/publisher: Community Agriculture Nutrition (CAN)
Format/size: pdf (3.3MB)
Date of entry/update: 16 February 2012


Title: Community Agriculture and Nutrition - Handbook (English)
Date of publication: 2007
Description/subject: This Handbook is designed for both farmers and students to use in the field and during training. It is divided into eight sections, each one containing several topics and all illustrated with large clear pictures. The Handbook can be read from beginning to end or each topic can be read separately. Space is provided for readers to take notes and to add their own local knowledge...Our people have always been farmers. Farmers of the river lands, of the mountains, and of the forests. Due to civil war in Burma, more and more of us have migrated from our native lands and many now live in refugee camps along the Thai-Burmese border. The Royal Thai Government, its citizens, and non-government organisations have been very generous in their support to us. We have food, shelter, health care and education, and for this we are very thankful. But while we have been living in refugee camps we have slowly been losing our heritage, our wisdom, and our ways. For our children, rice comes from a warehouse, not grown on our own land by our own hands. In 1999, I asked the organisations that were already supporting us if they could help me look for ways to teach our children about agriculture and to help us live more self-sufficiently. The result of this is now called the CAN Project (Community Agriculture and Nutrition). This Handbook is the latest step in its ongoing development over 7 years with refugees and internally displaced people along the Thai-Burma border. There are many good books and resources on sustainable agriculture and we have learnt much from them. However refugees are constrained in their agricultural practices due to limited access to land, water and other resources. This Handbook attempts to present a summary of simple adaptations of ideas found in other books, manuals and resources on sustainable agriculture. This Handbook is not a textbook as such, but a compilation of different subjects for people to pick and choose. We know that it is not complete and I would ask anyone with ideas or suggestions to forward them so we can keep on learning. In the year 2000 I wrote a draft CAN Handbook. Then Jacob Thomson and I wrote the first CAN curriculum in 2001. Since then it has been used in training with nearly 5,000 school children, teachers, villagers, and staff of community-based and non-government organisations. Needless to say, since the first curriculum was drafted, we have had many experiences, learnt many lessons and made many changes.
Author/creator: David Saw Wah
Language: English
Source/publisher: Community Agriculture Nutrition (CAN)
Format/size: pdf (2.4MB)
Date of entry/update: 16 February 2012


Title: "Health Messenger" Magazine No. 26 -- special issue on Nutrition
Date of publication: December 2004
Description/subject: General Health: Underlying causes of malnutrition -- Why health workers should feel concerned by nutritional issues? Misconceptions Concerning Nutrition: Voices of Community Health Educators and TBAs along the Thai-Burmese Border; Micronutrients: The Hidden Hunger; Iron Deficiency Anaemia; The Vicious Circle of Malnutrition and Infection; Treatment: IDENTIFYING MALNUTRITION; MANAGEMENT OF ACUTE SEVERE MALNUTRITION; GROWTH MONITORING: THE BEST PREVENTION; Fortified Flour for Refugees living in the camp; Making Blended Flour at Local Level; The example of MISOLA Flour in Africa. Health Education: Pregnancy and Nutrition; Breastfeeding; WHEN RICE SOUP IS NOT ENOUGH: First Foods - the Key to Optimal Growth and Development; BUILDING A BALANCED DIET FOR GOOD HEALTH; From the Field: How Sanetun became a malnourished child?
Language: Burmese, English
Source/publisher: Aide Medicale Internationale (AMI)
Format/size: pdf (5.2MB)
Date of entry/update: 01 July 2007


Title: Promoting household food and nutrition security in Myanmar
Date of publication: 2001
Description/subject: "Myanmar has a policy of promoting food and nutrition security and, at the national level, food production is more than that required to meet the country’s needs. Nevertheless, food and nutrition surveillance has revealed that malnutrition still exists in the country, despite economic growth and national food self-sufficiency. The National Plan of Action for Food and Nutrition, formulated in 1994 and adopted in 1995, accorded priority to household food and nutrition security. Accordingly, in 1996, in partnership with the World Health Organization (WHO), the National Nutrition Centre embarked on a study of household food and nutrition security in Myanmar. A preliminary situation analysis revealed that transitional changes in the economic, demographic and social sectors have driven dramatic changes in people’s lifestyles, behaviour and practices and that these changes affect food and nutrition security. The present paper explores household and intrahousehold determinants of nutrition problems in Myanmar.".....Results Preliminary descriptive analysis demonstrated more acute malnutrition in the urban area than in the rural area for both the pre- and post-harvest periods. Furthermore, nutritional problems were more acute in both the urban and rural areas during the preharvest period than during the post-harvest period. Urban children consumed fewer calories than rural children during both the pre- and post-harvest times, while children in both rural and urban areas consumed fewer calories during the preharvest period than during the postharvest period, although all the differences were not statistically significant......Keywords: care of the vulnerable, food security, malnutrition, Myanmar, National Plan of Action for Food and Nutrition.
Author/creator: Aye Thwin MPH (NUTRITION), DFs&N, MB, BS
Language: English
Source/publisher: Asia Pacific J Clin Nutr (2001) 10(Suppl.): S34–S39
Format/size: pdf (231`K)
Alternate URLs: http://www.burmalibrary.org/docs14/Myanmar-Food-Security-Doc.pdf
Date of entry/update: 25 October 2009