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Nutrition

Websites/Multiple Documents

Title: Nutrition and Food Safety. Nutrition profile of member countries: Myanmar
Language: English
Source/publisher: World Health Organisation (WHO)
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 19 September 2011


Individual Documents

Title: "Health Messenger" Junior No. 7 - Nutrition
Date of publication: January 2007
Language: Burmese, English
Source/publisher: Aide Medicale Internationale (AMI)
Format/size: pdf (English, 8.5MB, Burmese, 8.5MB)
Alternate URLs: http://www.burmalibrary.org/docs4/HMJ-7-nutrition-bu.pdf
Date of entry/update: 07 November 2008


Title: Community Agriculture and Nutrition - Handbook (Burmese)
Date of publication: 2007
Description/subject: This Handbook is designed for both farmers and students to use in the field and during training. It is divided into eight sections, each one containing several topics and all illustrated with large clear pictures. The Handbook can be read from beginning to end or each topic can be read separately. Space is provided for readers to take notes and to add their own local knowledge...Our people have always been farmers. Farmers of the river lands, of the mountains, and of the forests. Due to civil war in Burma, more and more of us have migrated from our native lands and many now live in refugee camps along the Thai-Burmese border. The Royal Thai Government, its citizens, and non-government organisations have been very generous in their support to us. We have food, shelter, health care and education, and for this we are very thankful. But while we have been living in refugee camps we have slowly been losing our heritage, our wisdom, and our ways. For our children, rice comes from a warehouse, not grown on our own land by our own hands. In 1999, I asked the organisations that were already supporting us if they could help me look for ways to teach our children about agriculture and to help us live more self-sufficiently. The result of this is now called the CAN Project (Community Agriculture and Nutrition). This Handbook is the latest step in its ongoing development over 7 years with refugees and internally displaced people along the Thai-Burma border. There are many good books and resources on sustainable agriculture and we have learnt much from them. However refugees are constrained in their agricultural practices due to limited access to land, water and other resources. This Handbook attempts to present a summary of simple adaptations of ideas found in other books, manuals and resources on sustainable agriculture. This Handbook is not a textbook as such, but a compilation of different subjects for people to pick and choose. We know that it is not complete and I would ask anyone with ideas or suggestions to forward them so we can keep on learning. In the year 2000 I wrote a draft CAN Handbook. Then Jacob Thomson and I wrote the first CAN curriculum in 2001. Since then it has been used in training with nearly 5,000 school children, teachers, villagers, and staff of community-based and non-government organisations. Needless to say, since the first curriculum was drafted, we have had many experiences, learnt many lessons and made many changes.
Author/creator: David Saw Wah
Language: Burmese
Source/publisher: Community Agriculture Nutrition (CAN)
Format/size: pdf (3.3MB)
Date of entry/update: 16 February 2012


Title: Community Agriculture and Nutrition - Handbook (English)
Date of publication: 2007
Description/subject: This Handbook is designed for both farmers and students to use in the field and during training. It is divided into eight sections, each one containing several topics and all illustrated with large clear pictures. The Handbook can be read from beginning to end or each topic can be read separately. Space is provided for readers to take notes and to add their own local knowledge...Our people have always been farmers. Farmers of the river lands, of the mountains, and of the forests. Due to civil war in Burma, more and more of us have migrated from our native lands and many now live in refugee camps along the Thai-Burmese border. The Royal Thai Government, its citizens, and non-government organisations have been very generous in their support to us. We have food, shelter, health care and education, and for this we are very thankful. But while we have been living in refugee camps we have slowly been losing our heritage, our wisdom, and our ways. For our children, rice comes from a warehouse, not grown on our own land by our own hands. In 1999, I asked the organisations that were already supporting us if they could help me look for ways to teach our children about agriculture and to help us live more self-sufficiently. The result of this is now called the CAN Project (Community Agriculture and Nutrition). This Handbook is the latest step in its ongoing development over 7 years with refugees and internally displaced people along the Thai-Burma border. There are many good books and resources on sustainable agriculture and we have learnt much from them. However refugees are constrained in their agricultural practices due to limited access to land, water and other resources. This Handbook attempts to present a summary of simple adaptations of ideas found in other books, manuals and resources on sustainable agriculture. This Handbook is not a textbook as such, but a compilation of different subjects for people to pick and choose. We know that it is not complete and I would ask anyone with ideas or suggestions to forward them so we can keep on learning. In the year 2000 I wrote a draft CAN Handbook. Then Jacob Thomson and I wrote the first CAN curriculum in 2001. Since then it has been used in training with nearly 5,000 school children, teachers, villagers, and staff of community-based and non-government organisations. Needless to say, since the first curriculum was drafted, we have had many experiences, learnt many lessons and made many changes.
Author/creator: David Saw Wah
Language: English
Source/publisher: Community Agriculture Nutrition (CAN)
Format/size: pdf (2.4MB)
Date of entry/update: 16 February 2012


Title: "Health Messenger" Magazine No. 26 -- special issue on Nutrition
Date of publication: December 2004
Description/subject: General Health: Underlying causes of malnutrition -- Why health workers should feel concerned by nutritional issues? Misconceptions Concerning Nutrition: Voices of Community Health Educators and TBAs along the Thai-Burmese Border; Micronutrients: The Hidden Hunger; Iron Deficiency Anaemia; The Vicious Circle of Malnutrition and Infection; Treatment: IDENTIFYING MALNUTRITION; MANAGEMENT OF ACUTE SEVERE MALNUTRITION; GROWTH MONITORING: THE BEST PREVENTION; Fortified Flour for Refugees living in the camp; Making Blended Flour at Local Level; The example of MISOLA Flour in Africa. Health Education: Pregnancy and Nutrition; Breastfeeding; WHEN RICE SOUP IS NOT ENOUGH: First Foods - the Key to Optimal Growth and Development; BUILDING A BALANCED DIET FOR GOOD HEALTH; From the Field: How Sanetun became a malnourished child?
Language: Burmese, English
Source/publisher: Aide Medicale Internationale (AMI)
Format/size: pdf (5.2MB)
Date of entry/update: 01 July 2007


Title: Articles on Nutritional Health / အဟာရႏွင့္ဆိုင္ေသာ က်န္းမာေရး ေဆာင္းပါးမ်ား
Date of publication: November 2003
Author/creator: Doctor Aye Kyaw
Language: Burmese/ ျမန္မာဘာသာ
Format/size: pdf (805K)
Date of entry/update: 02 October 2012


Title: Nutrition profile of Myanmar
Date of publication: 2000
Description/subject: The document itself is undated. The date we use refers to the last date recorded in the page. The publication date is probably 2002.
Language: English
Source/publisher: World Health Organisation
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 18 April 2008


Title: Strengthening Nutrition Through Primary Health Care - The Experience of JNSP in Myanmar
Date of publication: December 1991
Description/subject: Summary: "Summarizes the objectives, implementation, and results of the highly successful Joint WHO/UNICEF Nutrition Support Programme (JNSP) in Myanmar (previously known as Burma). Initiated in 1983, JNSP aims to reduce infant and young child mortality, to improve child growth, and to reduce malnutrition in mothers. To date, the Programme has been implemented in 17 countries with widely varying results. The Myanmar project was distinguished from other JNSP projects because of its focus on the entire population, rather than on model districts or provinces, and its concentration on activities administered almost exclusively through the Ministry of Health. The Myanmar project was further characterized by a situation analysis, conducted prior to the start of the project, which yielded detailed and precise recommendations on how to improve nutrition. A description of the objectives and operation of the programme shows how the situation analysis allowed selection of a few activities for careful implementation and monitoring. The report also explains how a deliberate focus on education, coupled with nutrition monitoring, made it possible to do a few things very well at as low a cost as possible. Other distinctive features include operation through the existing infrastructure for primary health care services and avoidance of providing food supplements. A section devoted to the results of the project documents a decrease of under-three-year-old mortality, faster growth, a decline in protein-energy malnutrition, and improvements in young child feeding practices and health seeking behaviour of mothers. The report concludes that, despite poverty and a deteriorating economic situation, improvements in child health and nutrition can be achieved in a large population, over a short period of time, and at low per capita cost. A final section discusses the project in relation to the theory and practice of nutrition policies and programmes conducted in other countries. The Myanmar project was judged to be sustainable and suitable for replication, at low cost, in all countries that implement primary health care"
Language: English
Source/publisher: World Health Organisation (Regional Health Paper, SEARO, No. 20)
Format/size: pdf (220K)
Alternate URLs: http://whqlibdoc.who.int/searo/rhp/SEARO_RHP_20.pdf (original image file, 1.6MB)
Date of entry/update: 18 April 2008


Title: Specific Effects of Honey(from-The_Koran) / က်မ္းျမတ္ ကုရ္အန္ႏွင့္ ဟဒီးဆ္က်မ္းလာ ပ်ားရည္ ၏ထူးျခားသည့္ အာနိသင္မ်ား
Language: Burmese/ ျမန္မာဘာသာ
Format/size: pdf (1.89MB)
Date of entry/update: 02 October 2012