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Home > Main Library > Health > Threats to Health > Diseases > Communicable (infectious) diseases > Leprosy

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Leprosy

Individual Documents

Title: Leprosy-free, but stigma still hurts
Date of publication: 22 August 2010
Description/subject: “PEOPLE are afraid of us; when I go into town they give me a dirty look,” says U Mg Mg Khin, 73, a leprosy patient at the Mayanchaung Welfare Centre, Halegu township, in Yangon Division. “I have to hide my hands and legs whenever I go into town.” The centre, which is about 80 kilometres (50 miles) from Yangon and located close to the Yangon-Naypyitaw highway, operates under the Department of Social Welfare and currently houses 56 former leprosy patients.
Author/creator: Nilar Win
Language: English
Source/publisher: Myanmar Times
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 02 November 2010


Title: Leprosy Elimination in Myanmar, A Success Story
Date of publication: 2006
Description/subject: eprosy has been a major public health problem in Myanmar for many years. By the 1950s, Myanmar ranked as a country with one of the highest prevalence rates of the disease. The Government of Union of Myanmar had been fighting against the disease with the expertise and advice of the World Health Organization (WHO) and INGOs. WHO has closely supported the leprosy programme in Myanmar from the 1960s through several projects, as well as research to develop better preventive and curative methods against leprosy. WHO MDT was introduced in Myanmar in 1986. The leprosy prevalence at that time was 59.3 per 10,000 population with 222,209 registered leprosy cases in the country. Nationwide MDT Programme started in hyperendemic areas in 1988. The prevalence rate was 39.9 per 10,000 with 155,857 registered cases.
Language: English
Source/publisher: World Health Organization, SEARO
Format/size: pdf
Alternate URLs: http://www.searo.who.int/en/Section10/Section20/Section54_12168.htm
Date of entry/update: 02 November 2010


Title: JICA continues support for leprosy eradication project
Date of publication: 28 September 2003
Description/subject: THE JAPAN International Cooperation Agency (JICA) has already spent 300 million Yen (K275 million) in its five-year pilot project in leprosy control and rehabilitation in Myanmar, a senior official with JICA said last week. “JICA implemented a pilot plan in April 2000 which will run until March 2005. So far we have spent about 100 million Yen (Kyats 915m) annually,” said Dr Yutaka Ishida, Chief Adviser, Leprosy Control and Basic Health Services. The JICA project covers 48 townships in Mandalay, Magwe and Sagaing divisions including the Special Skin Hospital and a leprosy community in Hlegu Township in Yangon Division.
Author/creator: Khin Maung Soe
Language: English
Source/publisher: Myanmar Times
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 02 November 2010


Title: A Million Smiles: Eliminating Leprosyin South-East Asia
Date of publication: 2003
Description/subject: Leprosy patients are humans with eyes seeing others smiling and laughing, with ears hearing jokes and laughter, and with faces that could smile and laugh, but who never laugh or smile once they have acquired the disease. Now with multi-drug therapy, they are smiling and laughing like others. Excerpts from “Thitsar Yaysin [Holy Truths]" by Chit San Win# * Introduction Leprosy is a disease recognized globally as a dreadful illness associated with the great social, mental, and physical suffering. In ancient days, people knew leprosy as “Kushtha” as it was termed in Sanskrit. The disease is supposed to be originated in India and spread around the world over 2 500 years ago.
Author/creator: Than Sein, Kyaw Lwin
Language: English
Source/publisher: Regional Health Forum WHO South-East Asia Region(Volume 7,Number 1)
Format/size: html
Alternate URLs: http://www.searo.who.int/LinkFiles/Regional_Health_Forum_1.pdf
Date of entry/update: 02 November 2010


Title: A STUDY ON COMMUNITY KNOWLEDGE, BELIEFS AND ATTITUDES ON LEPROSY
Date of publication: 2003
Description/subject: Introduction: 1.1 Leprosy 1.2 History of leprosy 1.3 Stigma of leprosy 1.4 Health education 1.5 The global situation 1.6 Global strategy for the elimination of leprosy 1.7 Global strategy beyond the elimination phase 1.8 Leprosy in Singapore, Chapter 2 Review of Literature: 2.1 Community knowledge of leprosy 2.2 Beliefs and misconceptions about leprosy 2.3 Community attitudes towards leprosy 2.4 Measuring leprosy stigma 2.5 Community health practices 2.6 Effectiveness of interventions targeting knowledge and attitudes 2.7 Concluding remarks 2.8 Rationale for the study 2.9 Objectives, Chapter 3 Methodology: 3.1 Study design 3.2 Place of study 3.3 Study population 3.4 Sampling 3.5 Data collection 3.6 Interviewers 3.7 Pilot study 3.8 Data processing and analysis 3.9 Study variables 3.10 Minimizing errors 3.11 Ethical issues, Chapter 4 Results: 4.1 Descriptive Analysis 4.1.1 Socio-demographic variables 4.1.2 General information 4.1.3 Knowledge of leprosy 4.1.4 Misconceptions regarding leprosy 4.1.5 Attitudes towards leprosy patients 4.2 Statistical Analysis for Associations 4.2.1 Knowledge of leprosy by socio-demographic variables 4.2.2 Beliefs regarding leprosy by socio-demographic variables 4.2.3 Overall knowledge scores 4.2.4 Beliefs regarding the cause of leprosy by socio-demographic variables 4.2.5 Attitudes towards persons affected by leprosy 4.2.6 Overall attitudes scores 4.2.7 Median attitude scores 4.2.8 Relationship between overall knowledge, age, education and accommodation of the respondents with attitude score 4.2.9 Stigmatising attitudes towards leprosy.4.3. Stratified Analysis 4.3.1 Stratified analysis by age group 4.4. Multiple Regression Analysis, Chapter 5 Discussion and Conclusions: 5.1 Main findings 5.2 Limitations of the present study 5.3 Interpretation of findings 5.4 Conclusions 5.5 Recommendations, Chapter 6 References Appendices: Annexe I Questionnaire, Annexe II Operational definitions
Author/creator: PADMINI SUBRAMANIAM, MBBS.
Language: English
Source/publisher: Department of Community, Occupational & Family Medicine National University of Singapore
Format/size: pdf (725.81 K)
Date of entry/update: 02 November 2010


Title: Leprosy elimination programme in Myanmar
Date of publication: 2000
Description/subject: Leprosy has been endemic in Myanmar since ancient times. The earliest information on the prevalence of leprosy in Myanmar came from a report by the Leprosy Commission in India published in 1893. During the census in 1891, 6464 cases or 8.4 per 10000 population were recorded in a population of 7.5 million. But the illness was diagnosed by enumerators without the knowledge of leprosy. Several surveys have been carried out since 1932 (Tha Saing-Santra) which indicated high prevalence in various parts of the country
Author/creator: Dr. U Kyaw Lwin, M.B.,B.S.(Rgn)D, .P.H.(Canada)
Language: English
Source/publisher: MJCMP
Format/size: pdf (253.18 K)
Date of entry/update: 02 November 2010


Title: The efficacy and tolerability of rifampicin in Burmese patients with lepromatous leprosy
Date of publication: March 1978
Description/subject: SUMMARY — Seventy-one Burmese adult patients with lepromatous leprosy were treated with various regimens of rifampicin monotherapy, 450 mg. daily for 60 days or 900 mg. once weekly for 12 weeks or 450 mg. daily for six months. Of the patients, 18 had relapsed after stopping DDS therapy, 20 were intolerant of DDS, 18 were DDS resistant and 15 had received no previous treatment. Rifampicin produced a 75% reduction in the size of skin nodules in two thirds of the patients and a complete disappearance of nodules in the others. After one month drug treatment the MI fell to zero but the BI remained unchanged. The once weekly regimen was as effective as the daily treatment. Four patients had to be withdrawn due to ENL reactions. NOTE:The contents of this paper were presented at the Burma Medical Conference, 1977.
Author/creator: TIN SHWE, KYAW LWIN, KYO THWE
Language: English
Source/publisher: Hansen. Int
Format/size: pdf (298.66 K)
Date of entry/update: 02 November 2010


Title: Leprosy page on WHO website
Description/subject: Information about Leprosy including map of leprosy Myanmar Prevalence Rate/10,000 December 2005.
Language: English
Source/publisher: World Health Organization, SEARO
Format/size: html
Alternate URLs: http://www.searo.who.int/en/Section10/Section20/Section54_12168.htm
Date of entry/update: 02 November 2010