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Coal mining

Websites/Multiple Documents

Title: Google search results for coal mining myanmar
Description/subject: About 448,000 results (10 December 2017)
Language: English
Source/publisher: Google
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 10 December 2017


Individual Documents

Title: COAL BURNS BURMA: A COMPENDIUM ON DIRTY ENERGY - POWER PLANTS AND MINING
Date of publication: March 2016
Description/subject: Contents: Introduction... Coal Mining in Burma... Coal Mines... Pending Coal Mining Projects... Coal Fired Power Plants... Coal Fired Power Plants in Operation... Pending Coal Fired Power Plants... Opposition to Coal in Burma... List of NGOs Against Coal in Burma... Links to Articles/Reports About Combined Coal Mines + Coal... Fired Power Plants... Links to Articles/Reports About Coal Mines... Links to Articles/Reports About Coal Fired Power Plants......Introduction: "In recent years, as Burma (Myanmar) has moved toward democracy a particular four letter word has repeatedly made an appearance in news stories on the country's commerce and environment: coal. Lignite coal (soft, highly polluting) is one of a vast array of minerals, from platinum to tin, mined in Burma. Two coal-fired power plants have been established in Burma, and many more are in the works, even as much of the rest of the world (including neighboring China) seeks to close down coal powered facilities and switch to better energy sources. Severe effects on the health and environment of communities near the Tigyit mine and power plant in Shan State and the Ban Chaung mine in southern Burma have been documented. There is very strong local opposition to the coal projects proposed in several regions. During the 2015 United Nations Climate Change Conference in Paris, Burma was portrayed as innocent of contributing to Global Warming through emission of greenhouse gasses. There are relatively few petrol-using vehicles and little need to heat buildings. But Burma's rampant deforestation (the 3rd highest rate in the world, according to the 2015 Global Forest Resources Assessment) constantly decreases the country's role as beneficial forested "carbon sink." And a turn to coal fired power plants will drastically change the country's climate impact for the worse. This is particularly unfortunate when Burma has been identified as one of the nations most affected by Climate Change. According to Greenpeace, "Coal fired power plants are the biggest source of man made CO2 emissions. This makes coal energy the single greatest threat facing our climate." In 2015 the think tank Germanwatch ranked Burma second on its Global Climate Risk list due to extreme weather events from 1994 to 2013. Burma's vulnerabilities include disastrous floods and cyclones as well as fragile habitats, agriculture and watersheds. Respected weather expert Dr. Tun Lwin has warned against coal-fired power plants as a potential contributor to severe climate effects in Burma. This compendium includes links to news articles and reports in English from 2010 to March 2016 regarding coal mining and coal fired power plants in Burma. Links are also provided to some of the organizations opposing coal in Burma. Brief introductions about coal mining and coal fired power plants in Burma are provided, with lists of operating and pending coal projects. This material is intended as a convenient public resource for NGOs, INGOs, journalists and other researchers interested in Burma's environmental issues, energy sector and mining sector. Project Maje is not responsible for the content of any of the news articles and opinions cited in this report and does not vouch for the accuracy of any of them. Journalists and other researchers needing further information and advice regarding Burma's environmental issues can contact Project Maje."
Language: English
Source/publisher: Project Maje
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 05 May 2016


Title: We Used to Fear Bullets - Now We Fear Bulldozers (Burmese မန္မာဘာသာ)
Date of publication: October 2015
Description/subject: Dirty coal mining by military cronies & Thai companies, Ban Chaung, Dawei District, Myanmar.....Executive Summary: "This report was researched and written collaboratively by Dawei Civil Society Organizations and documents the environmental and social impacts of the Ban Chaung coal mining project in Dawei District of Myanmar’s Tanintharyi Region. Based on desk research, interviews with villagers, and direct engagement with companies and government, it exposes how the project was pushed ahead despite clear opposition from the local community. It documents the serious harm that has already been done to villagers’ health, livelihoods, security, and way of life, and the devastating contamination of local rivers and streams. It calls for the suspension of Mayflower Mining Company’s permit and operations at Ban Chaung until this harm is remedied and the project is effectively evaluated, monitored, and regulated in compliance with Myanmar law and international best practice. It advocates that local villagers should be given the opportunity to take ownership of their own path to development. Formerly mired in conflict, resource-rich Tanintharyi Region is now opened up to foreign investment, and is threatened by a flood of dirty industrial projects including the massive Dawei Special Economic Zone (SEZ) and seven coal-fired power plants. Among these dirty projects is a coal mine in the Ban Chaung area of Dawei District. The project is located in a sensitive recent conflict zone, where administration and territory is contested between the Myanmar government and the ethnic armed resistance organization, the Karen National Union (KNU). Taking advantage of contested administration and weak governance in this area, Myanmar crony company Mayflower Mining used its high-level connections to begin coal mining operations without proper safeguards to protect human rights and the environment. The project was pushed ahead without an Environmental and Social Impact Assessment (ESIA) and without the Free Prior and Informed Consent (FPIC) of local villagers. Mayflower Mining Company has a partnership with two companies from Thailand – East Star Company and Thai Asset Mining Company – that are operating on the ground in Ban Ban Chaung Coal Mining Report 2015 Chaung. Thai Asset has nearly completed building a road to transport Ban Chaung coal to the Theyet Chaung on the Tanintharyi coast, but its progress has been stalled due to a protest blockade by villagers. Meanwhile, East Star has already been operating a 60-acre open-pit mine at Khon Chaung Gyi village for more than three years, transporting nearly 500 tons of coal daily during the dry season according to local villagers. East Star has entered into a Joint Operating Agreement with Energy Earth Company, which will finance its mining operations and sell the coal on the market. May flower and its Thai partners plan to expand operations to mine for coal on at least 2,100 acres, threatening to take almost all of the local community’s agricultural land. Should it be allowed to expand, Ban Chaung coal mining would severely damage the health and livelihoods of approximately 16,000 villagers in the area, most of whom belong to the Karen ethnic group, and rely on fishing and farming. Indeed, many villagers are already suffering from increased pollution of air and water resources and land confiscations, of once productive agricultural land. East Star Company has dumped mining waste directly into the streams, causing fish to die off and local people to fall sick with troubling skin diseases. Uncontrolled coal fires, spontaneously combusting in waste and storage piles, have caused breathing problems in the community. An influx of outsiders along with the presence of the Myanmar military means local people no longer feel safe in their own villages. The project threatens the entire way of life of the indigenous Karen people of Ban Chaung, who have had their land passed down to them for generations. Although local people are overwhelmingly opposed to coal mining in their area, they were never given the chance to voice their concerns; only learning about the project once the bulldozers started digging on their land. Now, Ban Chaung villagers have joined together to challenge irresponsible coal mining in their area, and to call for alternative, democratic, and inclusive development in Tanintharyi Region."
Language: Burmese (ျမန္မာဘာသာ), English
Source/publisher: Tarkapaw Youth Group, Dawei Development Association (DDA), and the Tenasserim River & Indigenous People Networks (Trip Net)
Format/size: pdf (3.9MB), pptx (7.4MB)
Alternate URLs: http://www.burmalibrary.org/docs21/TRIPN-2015-10-We_Used_to_Fear_Bullets-Now_We_Fear_Bulldozers-en-...
http://www.burmalibrary.org/docs21/Frankie-Abreu-COMMUNITY-DRIVEN_NATURAL-RESOURCE_MANAGEMENT-en.pp...
Date of entry/update: 06 November 2015


Title: We Used to Fear Bullets - Now We Fear Bulldozers (English)
Date of publication: October 2015
Description/subject: Dirty coal mining by military cronies & Thai companies, Ban Chaung, Dawei District, Myanmar.....Executive Summary: "This report was researched and written collaboratively by Dawei Civil Society Organizations and documents the environmental and social impacts of the Ban Chaung coal mining project in Dawei District of Myanmar’s Tanintharyi Region. Based on desk research, interviews with villagers, and direct engagement with companies and government, it exposes how the project was pushed ahead despite clear opposition from the local community. It documents the serious harm that has already been done to villagers’ health, livelihoods, security, and way of life, and the devastating contamination of local rivers and streams. It calls for the suspension of Mayflower Mining Company’s permit and operations at Ban Chaung until this harm is remedied and the project is effectively evaluated, monitored, and regulated in compliance with Myanmar law and international best practice. It advocates that local villagers should be given the opportunity to take ownership of their own path to development. Formerly mired in conflict, resource-rich Tanintharyi Region is now opened up to foreign investment, and is threatened by a flood of dirty industrial projects including the massive Dawei Special Economic Zone (SEZ) and seven coal-fired power plants. Among these dirty projects is a coal mine in the Ban Chaung area of Dawei District. The project is located in a sensitive recent conflict zone, where administration and territory is contested between the Myanmar government and the ethnic armed resistance organization, the Karen National Union (KNU). Taking advantage of contested administration and weak governance in this area, Myanmar crony company Mayflower Mining used its high-level connections to begin coal mining operations without proper safeguards to protect human rights and the environment. The project was pushed ahead without an Environmental and Social Impact Assessment (ESIA) and without the Free Prior and Informed Consent (FPIC) of local villagers. Mayflower Mining Company has a partnership with two companies from Thailand – East Star Company and Thai Asset Mining Company – that are operating on the ground in Ban Ban Chaung Coal Mining Report 2015 Chaung. Thai Asset has nearly completed building a road to transport Ban Chaung coal to the Theyet Chaung on the Tanintharyi coast, but its progress has been stalled due to a protest blockade by villagers. Meanwhile, East Star has already been operating a 60-acre open-pit mine at Khon Chaung Gyi village for more than three years, transporting nearly 500 tons of coal daily during the dry season according to local villagers. East Star has entered into a Joint Operating Agreement with Energy Earth Company, which will finance its mining operations and sell the coal on the market. May flower and its Thai partners plan to expand operations to mine for coal on at least 2,100 acres, threatening to take almost all of the local community’s agricultural land. Should it be allowed to expand, Ban Chaung coal mining would severely damage the health and livelihoods of approximately 16,000 villagers in the area, most of whom belong to the Karen ethnic group, and rely on fishing and farming. Indeed, many villagers are already suffering from increased pollution of air and water resources and land confiscations, of once productive agricultural land. East Star Company has dumped mining waste directly into the streams, causing fish to die off and local people to fall sick with troubling skin diseases. Uncontrolled coal fires, spontaneously combusting in waste and storage piles, have caused breathing problems in the community. An influx of outsiders along with the presence of the Myanmar military means local people no longer feel safe in their own villages. The project threatens the entire way of life of the indigenous Karen people of Ban Chaung, who have had their land passed down to them for generations. Although local people are overwhelmingly opposed to coal mining in their area, they were never given the chance to voice their concerns; only learning about the project once the bulldozers started digging on their land. Now, Ban Chaung villagers have joined together to challenge irresponsible coal mining in their area, and to call for alternative, democratic, and inclusive development in Tanintharyi Region."
Language: English, Burmese (ျမန္မာဘာသာ)
Source/publisher: Tarkapaw Youth Group, Dawei Development Association (DDA), and the Tenasserim River & Indigenous People Networks (Trip Net)
Format/size: pdf (3.9MB), pptx (7.4MB)
Alternate URLs: http://www.burmalibrary.org/docs21/TRIPN-2015-10-We_Used_to_Fear_Bullets_Now_We_Fear_Bulldozers-bu-...
http://www.burmalibrary.org/docs21/Frankie-Abreu-COMMUNITY-DRIVEN_NATURAL-RESOURCE_MANAGEMENT-en.pp...
Date of entry/update: 06 November 2015


Title: KNU defends coal mining project despite local opposition
Date of publication: 20 November 2014
Description/subject: "Despite local opposition, the Karen National Union has deployed its staff to secure the area in Dawei Township, Taninthayi Region, where the Banchaung mining project is located, according to locals. On November 15, ethnic Kayin locals from Thabyuchaung, Kyaukhtoo, Kahtaungni and Kunchaungyi attempted to block the roads – Kunchaungyi Amara Road and Dawei-Myeik Union Road – which are used as transportation routes for the project. “Locals do not approve of the project at all. They voiced their objections at the company’s meeting last month. Nonetheless, the company keeps going. Therefore, the locals blocked two roads that link the project to surrounding towns. However, KNU soldiers cleared the path that leads to Thailand for coal transport. The KNU continues to provide security for the project,” said Naw Pi Tha Law, a member of a group working for the social welfare for Kayin people..."
Language: English
Source/publisher: "Eleven Media"
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 21 December 2014


Title: SAVE MONG KOK FROM COAL
Date of publication: July 2011
Description/subject: "Only 40 kms north of the Thai border in the mountains of eastern Shan State, Thai investors are poised to begin mining and burning large reserves of coal at Mong Kok. Ihis project — which will ravage a pristine valley and poison the Kok River, impacting countless Shan and northern Thai communities downstream - must be stopped immediately. The Italian-Thai Power Company has entered into agreements with the Burmese military regime to develop an open-pit coal mine and power plant at Mong Kok in eastern Shan State, to export both coal and power to Thailand. Home to over a thousand Shan, Lahu and Akha farmers, Mong Kok lies in a conflict zone, where troops of the Burmese junta clash regularly with ethnic resistance forces, and commit systematic abuses against the local peoples. The regime has poured troops into the area to secure the mining site. Villagers have been forced to sell their farmlands for a pittance, and are being forced into a resettlement site directly adjacent to the mining area. Many have fled to the Thai border. Conducted in secrecy and with armed intimidation, this project blatantly contradicts any standards of responsible investment. But if Thai investors think the project's impacts are going to stay safely outside their borders, they should think again. Hundreds of coal trucks a day and huge new power pylons will be blighting the scenic Chiang Rai landscape, while the mine and power plant will be flushing poisons into the Kok River - harming an ecosystem that sustains countless communities downstream in Thailand, and threatening the lucrative tourist trade along with it..."
Author/creator: Hark Mong Kok
Language: English, Shan, Burmese, Thai
Source/publisher: http://www.burmalibrary.org/docs11/save_mong_kok_from_coal_eng.pdf-red.pdf
Format/size: pdf (English - OBL version-2.6MB, original, 3.12MB; Shan - OBL version, 2.8MB, original, 3.34MB; Burmese - OBL version, 2.8MB, original, 3.37MB; Thai, OBL version, 2.7MB, original, 3.29MB
Alternate URLs: http://www.burmalibrary.org/docs11/save_mong_kok_from_coal_shan.pdf-red.pdf
http://www.burmalibrary.org/docs11/save_mong_kok_from_coal_burmese.pdf-red.pdf
http://www.burmalibrary.org/docs11/save_mong_kok_from_coal_thai.pdf-red.pdf
http://shansapawa.org/images/stories/publication/save_mong_kok_from_coal_eng.pdf
http://shansapawa.org/images/stories/publication/save_mong_kok_from_coal_shan.pdf
http://shansapawa.org/images/stories/publication/save_mong_kok_from_coal_burmese.pdf
http://shansapawa.org/images/stories/publication/save_mong_kok_from_coal_thai.pdf
Date of entry/update: 11 August 2011


Title: Poison Clouds: Lessons from Burma’s largest coal project at Tigyit
Date of publication: January 2011
Description/subject: Summary: "• Although Burma is rich in energy resources, the ruling military regime exports those resources, leaving people with chronic energy shortages. The exploitation of natural resources, including through mining, has caused severe environmental and social impacts on local communities as companies that invest in these projects have no accountability to affected communities. • There are over 16 large-scale coal deposits in Burma, with total coal resources of over 270 Million tons (Mt). Tigyit is Burma’s biggest open pit coal mine, producing nearly 2,000 tons of coal every day. • The Tigyit coal mine and coal-fi red power plant are located just 13 miles from Burma’s famous Inle Lake, a heritage site of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations. Water polluted by the mine and waste from the power plant fl ow into the Lake via the Balu Creek but no study of the impact of the project on the Lake has been made public. • Coal from the mine is transported to Burma’s only operating coal-fi red power plant in Tigyit. The plant uses 640,000 tons of coal per year to produce 600 Gigawatts of power with a capacity of 120 Megawatts. 100-150 tons of toxic fl y ash waste is generated per day. The majority of power from the plant is slated for use at an iron mining factory that will be operated by Russian and Italian companies. • Implementation of the mine and power plant began in 2002 by the China National Heavy Machinery Corporation (CHMC) and the Burmese companies Eden Group and Shan Yoma Nagar. • Two nearby villages of Lai Khar and Taung Pola were forced to relocate for the project and over 500 acres of farmlands have been confi scated. Farming families facing eviction and loss of lands are going hungry and have turned to cutting down trees to sell for fi rewood or migrated in order to survive. Explosions from the mine have destroyed local pagodas. • Air and water pollution is threatening the agriculture and health of nearly 12,000 people that live within a fi ve mile radius of the project who may eventually have to move out. Currently 50% of the local population is suffering from skin rashes. • The Pa-Oh Youth Organization and Kyoju Action Network have been monitoring the project since February 2010 and urges the companies and government to suspend operations pending full environment, social and health impact assessments. The organization also urges local communities not to sign documents without understanding them and to oppose corruption and exploitation which harms the communities’ livelihoods and natural resources."
Language: English
Source/publisher: Pa-Oh Youth Organization (PYO), The Kyoju Action Network (KAN)
Format/size: pdf (2.3MB - English; 2.2MB - Burmese; 2.3MB - Thai))
Alternate URLs: http://www.burmalibrary.org/docs11/PoisonClouds(bu).pdf (Burmese)
http://www.burmalibrary.org/docs11/PoisonClouds(th).pdf (Thai)
Date of entry/update: 02 February 2011