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Mizzima: "World Inequality is very



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            "World Inequality is very high", says UNDP Report

July 13, 2001
Mizzima News Group (www.mizzima.com)

There has been many impressive gains and progress in the past 30 years
in the human development. A child born today can expect to live eight
years longer than one born 30 years ago. Many more people can read and
write, with the adult literacy rate having increased from an estimated
47% in 1970 to 73% in 1999. The share of rural families with access to
safe water has grown more than fivefold. In the past 10 years, more than
100 developing and transition countries ended military or one-party rule
and formal commitment to international human rights standards has spread
dramatically since 1990. These are the findings of the latest Human
Development Report of the United Nations Development Program, which was
released on Tuesday.

The 2001 report entitled "Making New Technologies Work for Human
Development", however, pointed out that the pace of the progress and the
levels of achievement vary widely among regions and groups. For example,
of the 4.6 billion people in developing countries, more than 850 million
cannot read and write, nearly 2.4 billion do not have access to basic
sanitation and nearly a billion lack access to improved water sources.
While 11 million children under age five die each year from preventable
causes, around 1.2 billion people live on less than $ 1 a day. About 36
million people are living with HIV/AIDS globally at the end of 2000 and
95% of them are in developing countries. The world inequality is very
high. The richest 1% of the world's population received as much income
as the poorest 57%. The richest 10% of the people in United States
(around 25 million people) had a combined income greater than that of
the poorest 43% of the world's people (around 2 billion people). In only
eight countries do women hold 30% or more of the seats in parliament.

When we look at Burma, which has been under the military rule for
decades, the UN report further said that the junta spends a
disproportionately large amount on military than on public education and
health. While it spent only 0.2% of the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) on
public health, it spent 3.3% of GDP on military expenditure in 1998. Its
Human Poverty Index is ranked at 43 out of 90 developing countries,
close to Viet Nam and Congo.

It ratified only two (Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of
Discrimination Against Women and Convention on the Rights of the Child)
out of six major international human rights instruments.



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<center><font color="#3333FF"><font size=+2>"World Inequality is very high",
says UNDP Report</font></font></center>

<p><i><font color="#FF0000">July 13, 2001</font></i>
<br><i><font color="#FF0000">Mizzima News Group (www.mizzima.com)</font></i>
<p>There has been many impressive gains and progress in the past 30 years
in the human development. A child born today can expect to live eight years
longer than one born 30 years ago. Many more people can read and write,
with the adult literacy rate having increased from an estimated 47% in
1970 to 73% in 1999. The share of rural families with access to safe water
has grown more than fivefold. In the past 10 years, more than 100 developing
and transition countries ended military or one-party rule and formal commitment
to international human rights standards has spread dramatically since 1990.
These are the findings of the latest Human Development Report of the United
Nations Development Program, which was released on Tuesday.
<p>The 2001 report entitled "Making New Technologies Work for Human Development",
however, pointed out that the pace of the progress and the levels of achievement
vary widely among regions and groups. For example, of the 4.6 billion people
in developing countries, more than 850 million cannot read and write, nearly
2.4 billion do not have access to basic sanitation and nearly a billion
lack access to improved water sources. While 11 million children under
age five die each year from preventable causes, around 1.2 billion people
live on less than $ 1 a day. About 36 million people are living with HIV/AIDS
globally at the end of 2000 and 95% of them are in developing countries.
The world inequality is very high. The richest 1% of the world's population
received as much income as the poorest 57%. The richest 10% of the people
in United States (around 25 million people) had a combined income greater
than that of the poorest 43% of the world's people (around 2 billion people).
In only eight countries do women hold 30% or more of the seats in parliament.
<p>When we look at Burma, which has been under the military rule for decades,
the UN report further said that the junta spends a disproportionately large
amount on military than on public education and health. While it spent
only 0.2% of the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) on public health, it spent
3.3% of GDP on military expenditure in 1998. Its Human Poverty Index is
ranked at 43 out of 90 developing countries, close to Viet Nam and Congo.
<p>It ratified only two (Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of
Discrimination Against Women and Convention on the Rights of the Child)
out of six major international human rights instruments.
<p>&nbsp;</html>

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